One World Week Film Competition 2014

The National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI) ran its first ever One World Week Development Education (Global Youth Work) Film Competition as part of One World Week 2014. 

FINALISTS:


FDYS Wexford:



Greenhouse, Cork ( 2nd PLACE)

YMCA Ballincollig Cork:

Swan Youth Service, Dublin

M.C Teens: Dublin: WINNING ENTRY 

 

Other Entries:

 



Pavee Point:

 

 

The theme for this film competition is: The World Young People Want:

Connected, Respected, & Empowered

 

We want young people to explore their understanding of the interdependent and unequal world in which they live using the lens of the personal, local, national, and global. When developing your idea for the short film, think about the economic, environmental, cultural, technological and political aspects of your argument/focus and make links between local, national, and global.

Competition Rules HERE

Draft Consent Form HERE

 

The film competition is open to youth groups, youth organisations, and schools throughout Ireland.

 

We want to capture what young people’s views and attitudes are about the interconnected world in which they live – locally, nationally, and globally.

We want to hear young people’s views and understanding of what they want for themselves and other young people (in Ireland and throughout the world) in terms of being connected, respected, and empowered.

 

Categories and Prizes

 

Supporting materials to help you with your film  

NYCI has produced a number of educational resources that may support you in developing your film.

 

Check these out:

www.oneworldweek.ie/resources and

http://www.youthdeved.ie/nyci/publications

We would recommend you also go to www.developmenteducation.ie

 

More information

For further information about this competition and about One World Week 2014 please email Valerie at deved@nyci.ie

 

Like and join us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/NationalYouthCouncil

Follow us on Twitter: @nycinews

Hashtags for One World Week 2014: #oww14 #worldyoungpeoplewant

 

Background information (which may help):

We live in a time of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Skype, and Snapchat. We live today, in a world where 1.8 billion or one quarter of the world’s population is aged 10-24 years. We live in a globalised world, in changing times where our views, opinions, and learning are challenged through new knowledge, discoveries, achievements, expectations, communications, and opportunities. We interact with others on and offline, within our own communities and with those whom we have never met but with whom we’ve heard about, those with whom we’ve played online games, those with whom we’ve participated in a Google hangout or for whom we’ve signed an online petition.

 

Through film, we want young people to explore their understanding of the interdependent and unequal world in which they live using the lens of the personal, local, national, and global and linking this with the theme for the competition. When developing your film, think about the economic, environmental, cultural, technological and political aspects of your argument/focus.

 

Among the issues explored by development education explores are the good and bad news stories including: child labour, child soldiers, conflict, poverty, violence, employment, food, power, the economic crisis, the Millennium Development Goals, Post 2015, advocacy, genocide, aid, trade, consumption, mobile technology, migration, justice, LGBT issues, gender, diamonds, human rights, globalisation, fair trade, land, water, development, food sustainability, child protection, coffee, sustainable development, education, governance, democracy, Irish Aid, climate change, HIV and AIDS, asylum seekers, young people, homelessness, refugees, the Arts, NGOs, austerity, debt, chocolate, cocoa, hunger, governance, environment, work, discrimination, youth participation, youth voice and youth policy, health, etc.

 

In short, every issue is a development education issue which may have similar or different impacts on us in Ireland compared to others living in poorer countries or more challenging circumstances elsewhere in the world.

 

 

Development education in youth work aims to support young people to increase their awareness and understanding of the interdependent and unequal world in which we live, through a process of interactive learning, debate, action and reflection. DE challenges perceptions of the world and encourages young people to act for a more just and equal society at a local, national and international level.